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International Journal of Cell Biology
Volume 2013, Article ID 742923, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/742923
Review Article

The Mitochondrial Disulfide Relay System: Roles in Oxidative Protein Folding and Beyond

Cellular Biochemistry, University of Kaiserslautern, Erwin-Schrödinger Straße 13, 67663 Kaiserslautern, Germany

Received 9 July 2013; Accepted 1 October 2013

Academic Editor: Agnès Delaunay-Moisan

Copyright © 2013 Manuel Fischer and Jan Riemer. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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