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International Journal of Cell Biology
Volume 2014, Article ID 572097, 25 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/572097
Review Article

Methyl Jasmonate: Putative Mechanisms of Action on Cancer Cells Cycle, Metabolism, and Apoptosis

Laboratório de Bioquímica e Biologia Molecular do Câncer, Instituto de Bioquímica Médica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Avenida Carlos Chagas Filho 373, Prédio CCS, Bloco E, Sala 22, Ilha do Fundão, Cidade Universitária, 21941-902 Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil

Received 12 May 2013; Revised 6 November 2013; Accepted 7 November 2013; Published 6 February 2014

Academic Editor: Afshin Samali

Copyright © 2014 Italo Mario Cesari et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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