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International Journal of Cell Biology
Volume 2014, Article ID 715867, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/715867
Review Article

2-Cys Peroxiredoxins: Emerging Hubs Determining Redox Dependency of Mammalian Signaling Networks

1Korean Bioinformation Center, KRIBB, Daejeon 305-806, Republic of Korea
2Department of Life Science and Research Center for Cell Homeostasis, Ewha Womans University, 52 Ewhayeodaegil, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-750, Republic of Korea
3Global Top 5 Research Program, Ewha Womans University, 52 Ewhayeodaegil, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-750, Republic of Korea

Received 7 August 2013; Accepted 25 November 2013; Published 4 February 2014

Academic Editor: Agnès Delaunay-Moisan

Copyright © 2014 Jinah Park et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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