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International Journal of Cell Biology
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 367579, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/367579
Review Article

Hyaluronan Synthase: The Mechanism of Initiation at the Reducing End and a Pendulum Model for Polysaccharide Translocation to the Cell Exterior

Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, The Oklahoma Center for Medical Glycobiology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK 73190, USA

Received 2 October 2014; Accepted 14 January 2015

Academic Editor: Howard Beverley Osborne

Copyright © 2015 Paul H. Weigel. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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