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International Journal of Cell Biology
Volume 2015, Article ID 745237, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/745237
Research Article

Hyaluronan Synthase 3 Null Mice Exhibit Decreased Intestinal Inflammation and Tissue Damage in the DSS-Induced Colitis Model

Department of Pathobiology, Lerner Research Institute Cleveland Clinic, 9500 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44195, USA

Received 6 October 2014; Revised 19 January 2015; Accepted 20 January 2015

Academic Editor: Arnoud Sonnenberg

Copyright © 2015 Sean P. Kessler et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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