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International Journal of Cell Biology
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 834893, 20 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/834893
Review Article

Roles of Proteoglycans and Glycosaminoglycans in Wound Healing and Fibrosis

1Department of Regenerative Medicine and Cell Biology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC 29425, USA
2Department of Biomedical Engineering, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH 44195, USA
3Division of Rheumatology & Immunology, Department of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, 114 Doughty Street, Charleston, SC 29425, USA

Received 20 September 2014; Accepted 1 April 2015

Academic Editor: Arnoud Sonnenberg

Copyright © 2015 Shibnath Ghatak et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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