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International Journal of Chronic Diseases
Volume 2016, Article ID 7030795, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/7030795
Review Article

The Microbial Hypothesis: Contributions of Adenovirus Infection and Metabolic Endotoxaemia to the Pathogenesis of Obesity

Centre for Molecular Medicine and Biobanking, University of Malta, Msida, Malta

Received 24 July 2016; Revised 10 October 2016; Accepted 25 October 2016

Academic Editor: Jochen G. Schneider

Copyright © 2016 Amos Tambo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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