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International Journal of Computer Games Technology
Volume 2008, Article ID 783231, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2008/783231
Research Article

Story and Recall in First-Person Shooters

University of Portsmouth, Eldon Building, Portsmouth, Hampshire PO1 2DJ, UK

Received 28 September 2007; Accepted 15 February 2008

Academic Editor: Kok Wai Wong

Copyright © 2008 Dan Pinchbeck. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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