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International Journal of Dentistry
Volume 2017, Article ID 5269856, 6 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/5269856
Research Article

Salivary Alpha-Amylase Enzyme, Psychological Disorders, and Life Quality in Patients with Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis

1Oral Medicine Division, São Lucas Hospital, Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS), Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil
2Cellular and Molecular Biology, Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS), Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil
3School of Psychology, Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS), Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil
4São Lucas Hospital, Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS), Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil

Correspondence should be addressed to Fernanda Gonçalves Salum; rb.srcup@mulas.adnanref

Received 22 December 2016; Revised 22 February 2017; Accepted 5 March 2017; Published 19 March 2017

Academic Editor: Izzet Yavuz

Copyright © 2017 Juliana Andrade Cardoso et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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