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International Journal of Endocrinology
Volume 2013, Article ID 686315, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/686315
Review Article

Pharmacogenetics of Oral Antidiabetic Drugs

1Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus MC, 3015 CE Rotterdam, The Netherlands
2Pharmacy Foundation of Haarlem Hospitals, 2035 RC Haarlem, The Netherlands
3Medical Research Institute, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 9SY, UK
4Department of Internal Medicine 4, Faculty of Medicine, P. J. Šafárik University, 041 80 Košice, Slovakia
5Department of Internal Medicine 4, L. Pasteur University Hospital, Rastislavova 43, 041 90 Košice, Slovakia

Received 15 February 2013; Revised 28 October 2013; Accepted 28 October 2013

Academic Editor: Khalid Hussain

Copyright © 2013 Matthijs L. Becker et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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