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International Journal of Endocrinology
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 282489, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/282489
Review Article

Adrenal Disorders and the Paediatric Brain: Pathophysiological Considerations and Clinical Implications

1Department of Pediatric Neurology, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, 369 Fulham Road, London SW10 9NH, UK
2Unit of Genetics and Paediatric Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Messina, Italy
3National Center for Rare Diseases, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Rome, Italy
4Institute of Neurological Sciences, National Research Council, Catania, Italy
5Infantile Neuropsychiatry Unit, Department of Pediatrics, University of Messina, Italy
6Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Messina, Italy
7Chair of Pediatrics, Department of Educational Sciences, University of Catania, Italy

Received 27 June 2014; Accepted 12 August 2014; Published 3 September 2014

Academic Editor: Gian Paolo Rossi

Copyright © 2014 Vincenzo Salpietro et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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