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International Journal of Endocrinology
Volume 2014, Article ID 614074, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/614074
Review Article

Adipose Tissue and Adrenal Glands: Novel Pathophysiological Mechanisms and Clinical Applications

Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL 33136, USA

Received 30 April 2014; Accepted 24 May 2014; Published 11 June 2014

Academic Editor: Claudio Letizia

Copyright © 2014 Atil Y. Kargi and Gianluca Iacobellis. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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