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International Journal of Endocrinology
Volume 2014, Article ID 715148, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/715148
Research Article

Circulating Fractalkine Levels Predict the Development of the Metabolic Syndrome

Department of Endocrinology, The Affiliated Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, 3 East Qingchun Road, Hangzhou 310016, China

Received 16 January 2014; Revised 28 March 2014; Accepted 2 April 2014; Published 30 April 2014

Academic Editor: Kristin Eckardt

Copyright © 2014 Yin Xueyao et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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