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International Journal of Endocrinology
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 836529, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/836529
Clinical Study

Bone and Mineral Metabolism in Patients with Primary Aldosteronism

1Internal Medicine and Secondary Hypertension Unit, Department of Internal Medicine and Medical Specialties, University of Rome La Sapienza, Viale del Policlinico 155, 00165 Rome, Italy
2Department of Surgery, P.Valdoni, University of Rome La Sapienza, Viale del Policlinico 155, 00165 Rome, Italy

Received 18 December 2013; Accepted 12 March 2014; Published 3 April 2014

Academic Editor: Gianluca Iacobellis

Copyright © 2014 Luigi Petramala et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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