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International Journal of Endocrinology
Volume 2015, Article ID 458129, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/458129
Review Article

The Janus Face of Stress on Reproduction: From Health to Disease

Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Szigony 43, Budapest 1083, Hungary

Received 17 December 2014; Revised 17 March 2015; Accepted 20 March 2015

Academic Editor: Sabrina Corbetta

Copyright © 2015 Dóra Zelena. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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