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International Journal of Endocrinology
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 576576, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/576576
Research Article

Surgical and Pathological Changes after Radiofrequency Ablation of Thyroid Nodules

1UCO Chirurgia Generale, Cattinara Teaching Hospital, Strada di Fiume, 34100 Trieste, Italy
2SS Endocrinologia (UCO Medicina Clinica), Cattinara Teaching Hospital, Strada di Fiume, 34100 Trieste, Italy
3Department of Medical, Surgical, and Health Sciences, University of Trieste, Cattinara Teaching Hospital, Strada di Fiume, 34100 Trieste, Italy
4SC Radiologia, Maggiore Hospital, Piazza dell’Ospitale, 34100 Trieste, Italy
5SS Endocrinologia (III Medica), Maggiore Hospital, Piazza dell’Ospitale, 34100 Trieste, Italy
6UCO Anatomia e Istologia Patologica, Cattinara Teaching Hospital, Strada di Fiume, 34100 Trieste, Italy

Received 10 March 2015; Revised 14 May 2015; Accepted 1 July 2015

Academic Editor: Jack R. Wall

Copyright © 2015 Chiara Dobrinja et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has been recently advocated as an effective technique for the treatment of symptomatic benign thyroid nodules. It is not known to what extent it may affect any subsequent thyroid surgery and/or histological diagnosis. Materials and Methods. RFA was performed on 64 symptomatic Thy2 nodules (benign nodules) and 6 symptomatic Thy3 nodules (follicular lesions/follicular neoplasms). Two Thy3 nodules regrew after the procedure, and these patients accepted to undergo a total thyroidectomy. Here we present how RFA has affected the operation and the final pathological features of the surgically removed nodules. Results and Conclusions. RFA is effective for the treatment of Thy2 nodules, but it should not be recommended as first-line therapy for the treatment of Thy3 nodules (irrespective of their mutational status), as it delays surgery in case of malignancy. Moreover, it is unknown whether RFA might promote residual tumor progression or neoplastic progression of Thy3 lesions. Nevertheless, here we show for the first time that one session of RFA does not affect subsequent thyroid surgery and/or histological diagnosis.