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International Journal of Endocrinology
Volume 2015, Article ID 597247, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/597247
Review Article

Treatment of Primary Aldosteronism and Organ Protection

Hypertension Unit, Internal Medicine, Department of Experimental and Clinical Medical Sciences, University of Udine, 33100 Udine, Italy

Received 1 December 2014; Accepted 31 March 2015

Academic Editor: Faustino R. Perez-Lopez

Copyright © 2015 Cristiana Catena et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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