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International Journal of Endocrinology
Volume 2015, Article ID 615356, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/615356
Review Article

A Role for Estrogen in Schizophrenia: Clinical and Preclinical Findings

1Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010, Australia
2School of Psychology and Public Health, La Trobe University, Bundoora, VIC 3086, Australia

Received 1 July 2015; Revised 21 August 2015; Accepted 23 August 2015

Academic Editor: Haifei Shi

Copyright © 2015 Andrea Gogos et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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