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International Journal of Endocrinology
Volume 2015, Article ID 693204, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/693204
Review Article

Circadian Clocks and the Interaction between Stress Axis and Adipose Function

Chronophysiology Group, Medical Department I, University of Lübeck, 23538 Lübeck, Germany

Received 9 December 2014; Revised 3 April 2015; Accepted 3 April 2015

Academic Editor: Javier Salvador

Copyright © 2015 Isa Kolbe et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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