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International Journal of Endocrinology
Volume 2015, Article ID 705169, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/705169
Review Article

Tumor-Associated Mast Cells in Thyroid Cancer

1Department of Molecular Medicine and Medical Biotechnology (DMMBM), University of Naples Federico II, 80131 Naples, Italy
2Institute of Endocrinology and Experimental Oncology (IEOS), CNR, “G. Salvatore”, 80131 Naples, Italy
3Department of Translational Medical Sciences (DiSMeT), University of Naples Federico II, 80131 Naples, Italy
4Center for Basic and Clinical Immunologic Research (CISI), University of Naples Federico II, 80131 Naples, Italy

Received 24 April 2015; Revised 16 June 2015; Accepted 15 July 2015

Academic Editor: Janete Cerutti

Copyright © 2015 Carla Visciano et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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