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International Journal of Endocrinology
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 9473158, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/9473158
Research Article

Lipid Profile in Adolescent Girls with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus and Hyperandrogenemia

1Department of Pediatrics and Pediatric Endocrinology, School of Medicine in Katowice, Medical University of Silesia, Medykow Street 16, 40-752 Katowice, Poland
2Department of Pediatric Diabetes, School of Medicine in Katowice, Medical University of Silesia, Medykow Street 16, 40-752 Katowice, Poland
3Department of Woman’s Health, School of Medicine in Katowice, Medical University of Silesia, Medykow Street 12, 40-752 Katowice, Poland
4Department of Instrumental Analysis, School of Pharmacy in Sosnowiec, Medical University of Silesia, Jednosci Street 8, 41-200 Sosnowiec, Poland

Received 17 January 2016; Revised 30 March 2016; Accepted 6 April 2016

Academic Editor: Mario Maggi

Copyright © 2016 Agnieszka Zachurzok et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Study Objectives. The study aim was to evaluate whether hyperandrogenemia in adolescent girls with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) may adversely influence lipid profile. Design and Participants. Lipid levels in 16 diabetic girls with biochemical hyperandrogenemia (T1DM-H) aged 16.3 ± 1.2 years were compared to 38 diabetic girls with normal androgen levels (T1DM-N) aged 15.8 ± 1.2 years. 15 healthy girls served as controls (CG). In all patients, anthropometric measurements were done, and androgens and SHBG were assessed. Results. In T1DM-H, total cholesterol (TC) and low density cholesterol (LDL-ch) were significantly higher than in CG (196.1 ± 41.2 versus 162.7 ± 31.7 mg/dL, ; 117.3 ± 33.1 versus 91.3 ± 27.8 mg/dL, , resp.). Their LDL-ch, non-high density cholesterol (non-HDL-ch) concentrations, and LDL/HDL ratio were also significantly higher than in T1DM-N (117.3 ± 33.1 versus 97.7 ± 26.7 mg/dL, ; 137.3 ± 42.9 versus 113.3 ± 40.4 mg/dL, ; 2.8 ± 3.7 versus 1.6 ± 0.5, , resp.). In stepwise multiple linear regression, free androgen index (FAI) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) were associated with TC (, ), non-HDL-ch (, ), and LDL-ch (, ). Triglycerides and LDL/HDL ratio were (, , , resp.) related to testosterone, FAI, WHR, and mean HbA1c. Conclusion. Lipid profile in diabetic adolescent girls is adversely influenced by the androgens level, particularly in the group with higher WHR and poorer glycemic control.