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International Journal of Endocrinology
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 6180425, 12 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/6180425
Research Article

MiR-195 Inhibits Tumor Growth and Metastasis in Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma Cell Lines by Targeting CCND1 and FGF2

1Department of Endocrinology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510080, China
2Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou 510060, China
3State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center of Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou, China
4Breast Tumor Center, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510120, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Haipeng Xiao

Received 8 February 2017; Revised 23 April 2017; Accepted 2 May 2017; Published 27 June 2017

Academic Editor: Giuseppe Damante

Copyright © 2017 Yali Yin et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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