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International Journal of Endocrinology
Volume 2017, Article ID 7057852, 9 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/7057852
Research Article

Prolonged Survival of Subcutaneous Allogeneic Islet Graft by Donor Chimerism without Immunosuppressive Treatment

1Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Chang Gung Medical Center, Taoyuan, Taiwan
2School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan
3Department and Graduate Institute of Microbiology and Immunology, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan
4Center for Vascularized Composite Allotransplantation, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan

Correspondence should be addressed to Brend Ray-Sea Hsu; wt.gro.hmgc.mda@8560hb

Received 31 October 2016; Accepted 21 May 2017; Published 21 June 2017

Academic Editor: Dario Iafusco

Copyright © 2017 Brend Ray-Sea Hsu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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