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International Journal of Endocrinology
Volume 2018, Article ID 9689106, 2 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/9689106
Editorial

The Bone-Cardiovascular Axis: Mechanisms and Clinical Relevance

1Department of Cardiology, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria
2Division of Endocrinology and Diabetology, Department of Internal Medicine, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria
3Department of Cardiology, Swiss Cardiovascular Center Bern, Bern University Hospital, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland
4Hypertension Unit, Internal Medicine, Department of Experimental and Clinical Medical Sciences, University of Udine, Udine, Italy
5Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Endocrinology and Diabetology, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria
6Department of Health Sciences, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam and the Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Amsterdam, Netherlands

Correspondence should be addressed to Nicolas Verheyen; ta.zarginudem@neyehrev.salocin

Received 9 October 2017; Accepted 10 October 2017; Published 21 February 2018

Copyright © 2018 Nicolas Verheyen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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