Table of Contents
International Journal of Evolutionary Biology
Volume 2011, Article ID 484769, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/484769
Review Article

Molecular Adaptation of Modern Human Populations

State Key Laboratory of Genetic Resources and Evolution, Kunming Institute of Zoology and Kunming Primate Research Centre, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650223, China

Received 11 October 2010; Accepted 14 December 2010

Academic Editor: Darren Curnoe

Copyright © 2011 Hong Shi and Bing Su. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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