Table of Contents
International Journal of Evolutionary Biology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 595121, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/595121
Research Article

Is Speciation Accompanied by Rapid Evolution? Insights from Comparing Reproductive and Nonreproductive Transcriptomes in Drosophila

1Department of Biology, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4KI
2Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, P. O. Box 0834-03092, Balboa, Ancón, Panama

Received 10 January 2011; Revised 4 April 2011; Accepted 19 May 2011

Academic Editor: Jose M. Eirin-Lopez

Copyright © 2011 Santosh Jagadeeshan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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