Table of Contents
International Journal of Evolutionary Biology
Volume 2011, Article ID 615094, 17 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/615094
Review Article

Upper Pleistocene Human Dispersals out of Africa: A Review of the Current State of the Debate

Turkana Basin Institute, Stony Brook University, SBS Building 5th Floor, Stony Brook, NY 11794, USA

Received 15 October 2010; Revised 22 January 2011; Accepted 24 February 2011

Academic Editor: Darren Curnoe

Copyright © 2011 Amanuel Beyin. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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