Table of Contents
International Journal of Evolutionary Biology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 620754, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/620754
Review Article

The Adaptive Radiation of Cichlid Fish in Lake Tanganyika: A Morphological Perspective

1Laboratory of Animal Ecology, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-Oiwake, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8502, Japan
2Department of Zoology, University of Graz, Universitätsplatz 2, 8010 Graz, Austria

Received 30 December 2010; Accepted 21 February 2011

Academic Editor: R. Craig Albertson

Copyright © 2011 Tetsumi Takahashi and Stephan Koblmüller. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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