Table of Contents
International Journal of Evolutionary Biology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 689315, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/689315
Research Article

Neanderthals versus Modern Humans: Evidence for Resource Competition from Isotopic Modelling

1Laboratoire d’Anthropologie Bioculturelle, UMR 6578 CNRS/Université de la Méditerranée/EFS, Faculté de Médecine-Secteur Nord, Université de la Méditerranée, CS80011 Bd Pierre Dramard, 13344 Marseille Cedex 15, France
2Laboratoire Méditerranéen de Préhistoire Europe Afrique (LAMPEA)-UMR 6636-MMSH 5, rue du Château de l’Horloge-BP. 647, 13094 Aix-en-Provence Cedex 2, France

Received 15 October 2010; Revised 20 March 2011; Accepted 18 July 2011

Academic Editor: John Gowlett

Copyright © 2011 Virginie Fabre et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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