Table of Contents
International Journal of Evolutionary Biology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 741357, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/741357
Research Article

The Implications of the Working Memory Model for the Evolution of Modern Cognition

Departments of Anthropology and Psychology, University of Colorado at Colorado Springs, Colorado Springs, CO 80918, USA

Received 17 September 2010; Accepted 18 January 2011

Academic Editor: Parth Chauhan

Copyright © 2011 Thomas Wynn and Frederick L. Coolidge. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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