Table of Contents
International Journal of Evolutionary Biology
Volume 2011, Article ID 921312, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/921312
Research Article

Sequence Analysis of SSR-Flanking Regions Identifies Genome Affinities between Pasture Grass Fungal Endophyte Taxa

1Department of Primary Industries, Biosciences Research Division, Victorian AgriBiosciences Centre, 1 Park Drive, La Trobe University Research and Development Park, Bundoora, VIC 3083, Australia
2Molecular Plant Breeding Cooperative Research Centre, La Trobe University Research and Development Park, Bundoora, VIC 3083, Australia
3Bioprotection Research Centre, P.O. Box 84, Lincoln University, Lincoln 7647, Canterbury, New Zealand
4Dairy Futures Cooperative Research Centre, La Trobe University Research and Development Park, Bundoora, VIC 3083, Australia
5La Trobe University, Bundoora, VIC 3086, Australia

Received 14 October 2010; Accepted 10 December 2010

Academic Editor: Hiromi Nishida

Copyright © 2011 Eline van Zijll de Jong et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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