Table of Contents
International Journal of Evolutionary Biology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 961401, 25 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/961401
Review Article

A Chronological Perspective on the Acheulian and Its Transition to the Middle Stone Age in Southern Africa: The Question of the Fauresmith

Australian Archaeomagnetism Laboratory, School of Historical and European Studies, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, La Trobe University, Melbourne, VIC 3086, Australia

Received 8 November 2010; Revised 25 January 2011; Accepted 27 March 2011

Academic Editor: Parth Chauhan

Copyright © 2011 Andy I. R. Herries. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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