Table of Contents
International Journal of Evolutionary Biology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 972457, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/972457
Review Article

Boule and the Evolutionary Origin of Metazoan Gametogenesis: A Grandpa's Tale

1CHROMEVOL-XENOMAR Group, Departamento de Biología Celular y Molecular, Facultade de Ciencias, Universidade da Coruña, Campus de A Zapateira s/n, E15071 A Coruña, Spain
2Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, University of Victoria, V8W 3P6 Victoria, BC, Canada V8W 3P6

Received 16 January 2011; Revised 18 April 2011; Accepted 9 May 2011

Academic Editor: Rob Kulathinal

Copyright © 2011 José M. Eirín-López and Juan Ausió. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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