Table of Contents
International Journal of Evolutionary Biology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 207958, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/207958
Review Article

Why Chromosome Palindromes?

Department of Biology, University of Texas at Arlington, Box 19498, Arlington, TX 76019, USA

Received 31 March 2012; Accepted 9 May 2012

Academic Editor: Hideki Innan

Copyright © 2012 Esther Betrán et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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