Table of Contents
International Journal of Evolutionary Biology
Volume 2012, Article ID 278903, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/278903
Research Article

Cuticular Hydrocarbon Content that Affects Male Mate Preference of Drosophila melanogaster from West Africa

1Department of Population Genetics, National Institute of Genetics, Mishima 411-8540, Japan
2Department of Genetics, The Graduate University for Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI), Mishima 411-8540, Japan
3Science and Technology, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto 606-8585, Japan
4Laboratory of Insect Behavior, National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences (NIAS), Ohwashi 1-2, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0851, Japan
5Center for Bioresource Field Science, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto 606-8585, Japan
6Insect Biomedical Research Center, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto 606-8585, Japan
7Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Kobe University, Kobe 657-8501, Japan
8Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan

Received 14 July 2011; Accepted 16 November 2011

Academic Editor: Chau-Ti Ting

Copyright © 2012 Aya Takahashi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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