Table of Contents
International Journal of Evolutionary Biology
Volume 2012, Article ID 394026, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/394026
Review Article

The Ecology of Bacterial Genes and the Survival of the New

1Unitat Mixta d'Investigació en Genòmica i Salut, Centre Superior d'Investigació en Salut Pública i Institut Cavanilles de Biodiversitat i Biologia Evolutiva, 46020 València, Spain
2School of Natural Sciences, University of California, Merced, CA 95343, USA

Received 21 April 2012; Accepted 26 June 2012

Academic Editor: Frédéric Brunet

Copyright © 2012 M. Pilar Francino. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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