Table of Contents
International Journal of Evolutionary Biology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 436196, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/436196
Review Article

Transposon Invasion of the Paramecium Germline Genome Countered by a Domesticated PiggyBac Transposase and the NHEJ Pathway

1CNRS, Centre de Génétique Moléculaire, UPR3404, 1 Avenue de la Terrasse, 91198 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex, France
2CNRS, Centre de Recherches de Gif-sur-Yvette, FRC3115, 91198 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex, France
3Université Paris-Sud, Département de Biologie, 91405 Orsay, France
4Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Sciences du Vivant, 75205 Paris Cedex 13, France

Received 20 March 2012; Accepted 7 May 2012

Academic Editor: Frédéric Brunet

Copyright © 2012 Emeline Dubois et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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