Table of Contents
International Journal of Evolutionary Biology
Volume 2012, Article ID 724519, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/724519
Research Article

Genetic Innovation in Vertebrates: Gypsy Integrase Genes and Other Genes Derived from Transposable Elements

Institut de Génomique Fonctionnelle de Lyon, Université de Lyon, Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, CNRS, Université Lyon 1, 69364 Lyon Cedex 07, France

Received 25 May 2012; Accepted 15 July 2012

Academic Editor: Wen Wang

Copyright © 2012 Domitille Chalopin et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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