Table of Contents
International Journal of Evolutionary Biology
Volume 2012, Article ID 746825, 25 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/746825
Research Article

A Short-Term Advantage for Syngamy in the Origin of Eukaryotic Sex: Effects of Cell Fusion on Cell Cycle Duration and Other Effects Related to the Duration of the Cell Cycle—Relationship between Cell Growth Curve and the Optimal Size of the Species, and Circadian Cell Cycle in Photosynthetic Unicellular Organisms

1C/J. A. Moreno Fuentes 21, Ávila, 05400 Arenas de San Pedro, Spain
2C/Pilar de Zaragoza 78 4 A, 28028 Madrid, Spain

Received 28 September 2011; Revised 21 December 2011; Accepted 23 December 2011

Academic Editor: A. Moya

Copyright © 2012 J. M. Mancebo Quintana and S. Mancebo Quintana. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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