International Journal of Ecology

International Journal of Ecology / 2007 / Article

Research Letter | Open Access

Volume 2007 |Article ID 037364 | https://doi.org/10.1155/2007/37364

Derek Eamus, Anthony R. Palmer, "Is Climate Change a Possible Explanation for Woody Thickening in Arid and Semi-Arid Regions?", International Journal of Ecology, vol. 2007, Article ID 037364, 5 pages, 2007. https://doi.org/10.1155/2007/37364

Is Climate Change a Possible Explanation for Woody Thickening in Arid and Semi-Arid Regions?

Academic Editor: Jianguo (Jingle) Wu
Received04 Oct 2007
Accepted09 Dec 2007
Published31 Jan 2008

Abstract

Increased woody plant density (woody encroachment or woody thickening) is a globally observed phenomenon. Similarly, increased atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations and decreased pan evaporation rates are globally observed phenomena. In this paper, we propose that the former (increased woody plant density) is a product of the latter. We propose that decreased stomatal conductance and increased rates of carbon fixation arising from an enriched atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration, in conjunction with reduced rates of pan evaporation, result in increased woody plant density. We suggest that this is analogous to the increased woody plant density that is observed along rainfall gradients that span arid to mesic environments. From this conceptual model, we make three predictions, namely, that (a) long-term trends in tree water-use-efficiency should reveal increased values; (b) run-off data should show an increase where woody thickening is occurring; (c) enriched CO2 experiments should reveal an enhanced plant water status. These three predictions are discussed and shown to be supported by experimental data.

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Copyright © 2007 Derek Eamus and Anthony R. Palmer. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


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