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International Journal of Ecology
Volume 2014, Article ID 135207, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/135207
Research Article

Venus Flytrap Seedlings Show Growth-Related Prey Size Specificity

School of Natural and Social Sciences, University of Gloucestershire, Francis Close Hall, Cheltenham, GL50 4AZ, UK

Received 13 December 2013; Revised 28 January 2014; Accepted 4 February 2014; Published 18 March 2014

Academic Editor: Ram C. Sihag

Copyright © 2014 Christopher R. Hatcher and Adam G. Hart. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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