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International Journal of Ecology
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 142429, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/142429
Research Article

Litter Fall and Its Decomposition in Sapium sebiferum Roxb.: An Invasive Tree Species in Western Himalaya

1Biodiversity Division, CSIR-Institute of Himalayan Bioresource Technology, Palampur, Himachal Pradesh 176061, India
2Department of Botany, Punjabi University, Patiala, Punjab 147002, India

Received 28 August 2014; Revised 20 October 2014; Accepted 21 October 2014; Published 13 November 2014

Academic Editor: Béla Tóthmérész

Copyright © 2014 Vikrant Jaryan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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