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International Journal of Ecology
Volume 2014, Article ID 202056, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/202056
Research Article

Potential Effects of the Loss of Native Grasses on Grassland Invertebrate Diversity in Southeastern Australia

School of Natural & Built Environments and Barbara Hardy Institute, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095, Australia

Received 27 September 2014; Revised 11 November 2014; Accepted 12 November 2014; Published 1 December 2014

Academic Editor: Béla Tóthmérész

Copyright © 2014 Roger Edgcumbe Clay. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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