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International Journal of Ecology
Volume 2016, Article ID 1323614, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1323614
Research Article

Patterns of Allocation CSR Plant Functional Types in Northern Europe

FSBSI Institute of Biology, Komi SC UB, Kommunisticheskaya Str., No. 28, Syktyvkar, Komi Republic 167928, Russia

Received 17 June 2016; Revised 26 September 2016; Accepted 19 October 2016

Academic Editor: Ram Chander Sihag

Copyright © 2016 Alexander B. Novakovskiy et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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