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International Journal of Ecology
Volume 2017, Article ID 1351854, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/1351854
Research Article

Coral Recruit-Algae Interactions in Coral Reef Lagoons Are Mediated by Riverine Influences

Department of Oceanography and Hydrography, Kenya Marine and Fisheries Research Institute, Silos Rd., English Point, Mkomani, P.O. Box 81651, Mombasa 80100, Kenya

Correspondence should be addressed to S. A. Mwachireya; moc.oohay@ayerihcawm

Received 18 January 2017; Revised 31 May 2017; Accepted 1 June 2017; Published 9 July 2017

Academic Editor: Daniel I. Rubenstein

Copyright © 2017 S. A. Mwachireya et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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