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International Journal of Ecology
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 8965983, 9 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/8965983
Research Article

Feasibility of Community Management of Miombo Woodlands for Carbon Project in Southern Highlands of Tanzania

1Ministry of Natural Resources and Tourism, Forestry Training Institute, Arusha, Tanzania
2Forest Economics, Sokoine University of Agriculture, Morogoro, Tanzania

Correspondence should be addressed to Z. J. Lupala; moc.oohay@alapulhcaz

Received 4 March 2017; Revised 29 May 2017; Accepted 18 June 2017; Published 7 August 2017

Academic Editor: Daniel I. Rubenstein

Copyright © 2017 Z. J. Lupala et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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