International Journal of Electrochemistry

International Journal of Electrochemistry / 2012 / Article
Special Issue

New Trends on the Boron-doped Diamond Electrode: From Fundamental Studies to Applications

View this Special Issue

Review Article | Open Access

Volume 2012 |Article ID 218393 | 7 pages | https://doi.org/10.1155/2012/218393

A Brief Review on the In Situ Synthesis of Boron-Doped Diamond Thin Films

Academic Editor: Carlos Alberto Martinez-Huitle
Received10 Apr 2011
Accepted21 May 2011
Published11 Sep 2011

Abstract

Diamond thin films are well known for their unsurpassed physical and chemical properties. In the recent past, research interests in the synthesis of conductive diamond thin films, especially the boron-doped diamond (BDD) thin films, have risen up to cater to the requirements of electronic, biosensoric, and electrochemical applications. BDD thin films are obtained by substituting some of the hybridized carbon atoms in the diamond lattice with boron atoms. Depending on diamond thin film synthesis conditions, boron doping routes, and further processing steps (if any), different types of BDD diamond thin films with application-specific properties can be obtained. This paper will review several important advances in the synthesis of boron-doped diamond thin films, especially those synthesized via gas phase manipulation.

1. Introduction

Diamond thin films, which are nowadays routinely synthesized by employing chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique, possess unique properties like high thermal conductivity, high carrier mobilities, high break-down field characteristics, chemical inertness, biocompatibility, bio-sensing ability and so forth [111]. In the recent past, researchers worldwide have been exploring diamond thin films especially for electronics, biosensing, and electrochemical applications [911]. However, to realize these applications, it is necessary that the diamond thin films are electrically conductive in nature (in addition to possessing a combination of the above-mentioned properties) which are otherwise insulating. The conductivity of diamond thin films can be attuned to an application requirement typically by carrying out suitable doping events. Amongst the available conductive (doped, p- and n-type [916]) diamond thin films, the p-type semiconducting boron-doped diamond (BDD) thin films [1735] are the most popular ones and are being studied extensively. BDD thin films are synthesized by substituting some of the hybridized carbon atoms in the diamond lattice with boron atoms. BDD thin films are mainly obtained by (i) in situ (during diamond thin film synthesis) and (ii) ex situ (after diamond thin film synthesis) doping routes. In situ doping involves gas phase manipulation, that is, addition of certain amount of boron containing gas species to the diamond forming gas mixtures during the diamond thin film synthesis. Ex situ doping involves boron doping into the already synthesized diamond thin films mainly via ion implantation. Depending on the diamond thin film synthesis conditions and the above-mentioned boron doping routes, and further processing steps (if any), different types of BDD thin films with application-specific properties can be obtained. BDD thin films-based electrochemical sensors, biosensors, water purification electrodes, unipolar devices, ultraviolet light generators, and so forth have already been developed [911].

This article will review several advances in the synthesis of BDD thin films (especially those synthesized via gas phase doping) that bought about unique variations in physical and chemical characteristics of the films making them as suitable electrode materials. In the next section, a brief discussion on the typical CVD technique used to synthesize diamond thin films will be made. In the subsequent section, several aspects of BDD thin films including concept of doping, in situ boron doping, and electrode applications will be discussed. This paper will be concluded with several remarks on BDD thin films.

2. CVD of Diamond Thin Films

In CVD of diamond thin films, one carbon atom at a time is added from a carbon containing activated gas phase (maintained at a lower pressure) to an initial template (a pretreated substrate) resulting in a thin film that constitutes carbon atom network (the diamond). Typical CVD diamond thin film synthesis protocol involves gas mixture activation, gas-phase reactions, and the subsequent transfer of diamond forming gas species onto the substrate surface; subsequent surface reactions lead to the formation of a diamond thin film. Hydrocarbon (typically methane)/hydrogen gas mixtures are employed and their activation leads to a harsh environment dominated by reactions involving atomic hydrogen. Activation can be done via surface-mediated thermal process (as in hot filament CVD) or via energy transfer from gas-phase collisions with excited free electrons (as in microwave plasma enhanced CVD). Due to the activation, molecular hydrogen (H2) dissociates into atomic hydrogen. Diamond growth takes place via site-activation by a surface hydrogen abstraction reaction (1), followed by addition reaction (2) of a hydrocarbon radical like CH3. represents a surface radical. The competition between surface activation reaction (1) and H-atom recombination reaction with the surface radical site (3) determines the number of active nucleation sites available for a particular set of synthesis conditions.

The stable nanosized crystallites formed during the nucleation stage typically exhibit spherical shapes. With time, nucleation density increases up to a certain value upon which it terminates or ceases to occur at a measurable rate. The isolated crystallites now grow and develop facets due to the relatively high rate of surface carbon diffusion from the surrounding surface sites. Once the crystals grow large enough to coalesce with each another, they form grain boundaries and then continue growing as a continuous diamond film. The morphology of a growing diamond surface depends on the rates at which different diamond planes grow. Under typical growth conditions, the morphology assessment of a diamond film can be made by the growth parameter where and are the normal growth velocities of (100) and (111) diamond planes, respectively. The grains exhibiting the fastest growth in the direction perpendicular to the substrate overshadow other slower-growing grains to form a continuous film with a columnar structure. This mode of film growth is known as evolutionary selection principle. Diamond grain growth dependent on facet reactivity and selectivity which is on the contrary to evolutionary selection principle is also possible under certain CVD experimental conditions. Depending on the synthesis conditions like substrate surface pretreatment, reaction temperature and pressure, and gas composition, epitaxial, oriented, and polycrystalline (with micron- and nano-sized grains) diamond thin films (Figure 1) can be synthesized. Please refer to chapter 2 in reference [11] for more details on aspects of diamond thin film nucleation and growth.

After the advent of low pressure gas phase synthesis (CVD) of diamond thin films [3840], numerous noteworthy and path breaking advances have successively taken place [111, 4149]; these advances have made the following possible: (i) tremendous increase in diamond thin film growth rates, (ii) substrate selectivity and large area deposition, (iii) low temperature deposition, (iv) single crystalline thin film synthesis, (v) phase mixture diamond nanocomposite thin film deposition, (vi) doped diamond thin film synthesis, and so forth. At present various CVD methods such as hot filament, direct current (DC) plasma, radio frequency (RF) plasma, microwave plasma, electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) microwave plasma CVD, and so forth, and their hybrids are being used to synthesize diamond thin films with highly consistent and desired properties.

3. BDD Films

3.1. Concept of Doping Diamond Thin Films

Diamond is electrically semiconducting (almost insulating) in nature as a consequence of the tetrahedral closed/tight arrangement of carbon atoms that form the diamond lattice; the band structure of diamond constitutes a completely filled valence band and an empty conduction band separated by a wide band gap of 5.5 eV [5053]. The energy band diagram of boron-doped diamond is shown in Figure 2. Diamond thin films synthesized via the previously mentioned CVD routes (Section 2) are also insulating in nature unless and otherwise they are synthesized in some special and specific conditions. As discussed previously, for many applications the diamond thin films need to be electrically conductive in nature to a desired extent (semiconducting through metallic to even superconducting). There are several ways of achieving this via controlled experiments.

Several nanometers depth of a hydrogen terminated diamond thin film surface can be made p-type semiconductive typically by exposing (via physisorption) it to appropriate adsorbates. These surface adsorbates can be solvated ionic species or neutral species with high electron affinity; in the former case, the species apparently extract electrons from the valence band and react electrochemically and in the later case, the species reduce the ionization potential of the diamond surface and makes its electron affinity apparently negative which in turn leads to an exchange of electrons between the valence band and the species. These processes leave behind holes as the charge carriers. This hole-mediated conduction is explained in terms of a doping famously known as surface transfer doping [5456]. Diamond thin films can also be made conducting by annealing them under vacuum at high temperatures [57]. Due to annealing, the nondiamond conductive carbon phase formed along the diamond grain boundaries and structural defects formed in the film bulk will result in p-type semiconduction.

As mentioned previously, diamond thin films can also be made conductive by substitutional doping. Here, hetero-atoms (like B, Al, N, P, S, Si, Ni, As, Sb, Cr, Ni, Fe, W, Mo, etc.) with slightly different electronic configurations are made substitutes for some of the carbon atoms in the diamond lattice leading to the formation of new energy levels in the band structure that facilitate both p- and n-type conduction depending on the type of dopant. The introduction of a p-type dopant (B, Al, etc.) causes the formation of discrete acceptor levels (Figure 2) above the valence band of diamond. These energy levels are accessible to valence band electrons. When electrons are promoted into these levels, delocalized holes form in the valence band which facilitates the conductance. A hetero-atom inclusion causes n-type doping (N, P, etc.) by forming a donor level whose electrons can be easily excited into the conduction band.

The closely packed diamond lattice makes substitutional doping, a challenging task. Some of the above-mentioned dopants can be incorporated into the lattice during the synthesis of diamond thin films whilst some can be incorporated via ion implantation [5860]. Doping via ion-implantation involves forcing the dopant ions into the subsurface regions of diamond thin films rendering them semiconductive. During ion-implantation, since the dopant ion energy is greater than the binding energy of the carbon atoms, not only severe damage takes place in the diamond thin films but there is also a possibility of disturbing the stability of the metastable bonds leading to the formation of stable graphitic bonds upon subsequent high temperature annealing that is carried out to annihilate the damages. However, doping and damage levels can be evaluated prior to the ion-implantation experiments via computer simulations [61], and proper experiments can then be carried out. It has also been pointed out that doping via ion-implantation leads to the formation of resistive diamond thin films, probably due to the compensation (of the desired electrical activity of the dopants) arising from damage-related centers forming in between acceptor and donor energy levels [62]. Other substitutional doping issues that are still difficult to experimentally overcome are (i) high solubility of certain dopants like nitrogen leading to the formation of valueless very deep donor energy levels and (ii) the development of shallow n-type dopants [62].

Amongst the above-mentioned substitutional dopants, the most exploited and successful one is undoubtedly boron. Both geometrically (covalent radius of boron atom is 0.088 nm whilst that of carbon atom is 0.077 nm) and energetically [62] boron atoms are probably the only dopants that can be substitutes for carbon atoms in the diamond lattice. Boron doping into diamond thin films can be done by using any of the following: (i) gas phase manipulations while synthesizing diamond thin films via CVD routes, (ii) ion-implantation, and (iii) high temperature diffusion [25]. In the next section, various aspects of gas phase synthesis (in situ) of BDD thin films will be discussed.

3.2. BDD Thin Films via In Situ Doping

Boron containing precursors like diborane, trimethylboron, triethylboron, boron oxide dissolved in acetone/ethanol/methanol, trimethyl borate dissolved in the acetone [35], borane trimethylamine, boron trichloride, boric acid, and other boron-containing unconventional sources (obtained via etching boron, boron oxide, boron nitride, and boron rod) have been introduced into the gas phase during the CVD of diamond thin films to finally obtain BDD thin films [59, 60]. Theoretical thermodynamic studies suggested that the concentrations of BH3, BH2, and BH radicals in the activated B-C-H gas mixture modify the concentrations of diamond forming radicals (like CH3, C2H2, etc.) and atomic hydrogen [63]. The relative efficiencies of boron and carbon incorporation into a growing film from a given B-C-H gas mixture are dependent upon gas phase activation route and other diamond synthesis conditions [64]. During the synthesis of BDD films, the boron species formed in the gas phase give assistance to the surface diffusion of diamond forming species on the already formed diamond surfaces [65]. This leads to the incorporation of boron atoms into both the growing and diamond thin film surfaces. It was found that there is preference (almost 10 times) in the incorporation of boron in growth sectors [2830]. Boron substitution, diamond crystallinity, and diamond surface morphology are closely related and greatly influence each other during the in situ synthesis of BDD thin films [66, 67]. Boron concentration relative to carbon in the gas phase (B/C) has also a strong effect on the growing diamond crystals structure and stability. Low level (<500 ppm B/C) boron addition into the gas-phase not only increases the sizes of growing diamond crystals that will finally constitute the diamond thin film but also enhances the diamond film growth rates. Intermediate level (1000–5000 ppm B/C) boron addition results in p-type BDD thin films with other characteristics similar to the diamond thin films that will be obtained without boron in the gas phase at the same experimental conditions. High level (>4000 ppm B/C) boron addition results in the loss of crystallinity [31, 32]. Still higher level (8000–10000 ppm B/C) disturbs the diamond phase stability. At this level of boron concentration, the much needed (to selectively etch graphite over diamond) atomic hydrogen content in the gas phase gets depleted due to the increase in reactions between boron species and hydrogen. This in turn results in tremendous decrease in rate at which graphite is etched. Thereby more graphitic content can be found along with diamond in the final BDD thin films [33]. Synthesis of diamond thin films via CVD routes generally takes place in a highly diluted hydrogen gas environment. Thereby hydrogen develops as an impurity within the diamond lattice; but in the case of in situ boron doping, hydrogen can form a complex with substituted boron within the lattice and pacify it, which is undesired [68]. It has also been shown that deuterated BDD thin films can be n-type electrical conductors [69]. It has also been shown that single substitutional boron atoms are more stable than boron pairs [62, 70]. If carefully observed, irrespective of the CVD and doping methodologies, an approximately equal ratio of boron to carbon as used in the gas phase constitutes the BDD thin film composition [71].

Substrate selection is very important to synthesize BDD thin films as electrode materials. BDD thin films are often deposited on conductive and self-passivating substrates [7277]. Natural diamond single crystals, Silicon, graphite, glassy carbon, carbon fiber, titanium, tantalum, tungsten, molybdenum, and niobium are the commonly used substrate materials. Uniform and defect-free BDD thin films can be deposited on silicon substrates. But the brittleness of silicon limits its usage in applications. Also, large area depositions are not possible on silicon. Large area BDD thin film depositions are possible on metal substrates. But to protect the metal substrates from hydrogen embrittlement during CVD process and to improve the adhesion of BDD thin film, an interlayer deposition prior to the BDD deposition is often needed. Thick free-standing BDD thin films can also be obtained. Firstly the thick film is deposited onto typically silicon substrates and in a subsequent step the silicon is removed by chemical etching. Single-crystalline BDD thin films can be obtained by using natural diamond single crystals as the substrates. BDD thin film-based conducting diamond electrodes are the most used ones [73]. In practice, it is required that the substitutional boron in BDD thin films stays in its position during any electrode operation in which the BDD film participates. Theoretically it was shown that the substitutional boron stays in the diamond lattice with a low dynamic distortion [62, 78], and its ionization energy has been predicted as 0.39 eV [62, 79] which matches very closely with the experimental value of 0.37 eV [80]. As the number of doped boron atoms in diamond lattice increases from high to very high values, the acceptor level starts to broaden into a band, and above boron atoms cm−3 in diamond lattice, the broadened band starts to overlap with the valence band resulting in a metal to insulator transition [60, 81]. BDD thin films with typically 1019–1021 boron atoms cm−3 in diamond lattice are useful, especially for electrode applications. BDD electrodes have been used to (a) detect very low concentrations of toxic metal ions like lead [82], (b) treat wastewater [83], (c) monitor industrial wastewater by determining chemical oxygen demand [84, 85], (d) synthesize organic and inorganic substances [86], (e) record neurochemical and electrical information in neural prosthesis [87], (f) sense several biomolecules [88], and so forth.

4. Conclusions and Future Perspectives

The research field of synthesis of BDD thin films has matured enough and is now delivering thin films with desired and reproducible properties. BDD thin films can now be synthesized routinely on a variety of substrates. However, the elementary general mechanisms of boron substitution into diamond lattice are not completely characterized, understood, and explained. This hinders the control on boron doping and thereby realization of applications that need to be yet explored. With the advent of powerful multiscale modeling and simulation (including quantum level) methodologies, it is now possible to (i) interpret complex experimental data and to establish predictive doping models, (ii) obtain clear-cut ideas on new dopants, and (iii) design and execute novel doping schemes. Compared to the p-type conduction in diamond thin films, n-type conduction has not that matured and demands a greater attention both experimentally and theoretically.

Acknowledgments

The first author thanks Professor Banda for inviting him to prepare this paper. He also thanks his wife Sailaja for proofreading this paper.

References

  1. P. K. Bachmann and R. Messier, “Emerging technology of diamond thin films,” Chemical and Engineering News, vol. 67, no. 20, pp. 24–39, 1989. View at: Google Scholar
  2. J. T. Field, “Electrical properties,” Properties of Natural and Synthetic Diamond, Academic Press, London, UK, 1992. View at: Google Scholar
  3. R. F. Davis, Diamond Films and Coatings: Development, Properties, and Applications, Noyes Publications, Park Ridge, NJ, USA, 1993.
  4. H. Lin and D. Dandy, Diamond Chemical Vapor Deposition, Nucleation and Early Growth, Noyes Publications, Park Ridge, NJ, USA, 1995.
  5. B. Dishchler and C. Wild, Low-Pressure Synthetic Diamond Manufacturing and Applications, Springer, Heidelberg, Germany, 1998.
  6. M. H. Nazaré and J. Neves, Properties, Growth and Applications of Diamond, INSPEC, London, UK, 2001.
  7. K. Kobashi, Diamond Films, Elsevier, Oxford, UK, 2005.
  8. O. A. Shenderova and D. M. Gruen, Ultrananocrystalline Diamond: Synthesis, Properties, and Applications, William Andrew, New York, NY, USA, 2006.
  9. S. Koizumi, C. Nebel, and M. Nesladek, Physics and Applications of CVD Diamond, Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, Germany, 2008.
  10. R. S. Sussmann, CVD Diamond for Electronic Devices and Sensors, John Wiley & Sons, West Sussex, UK, 2009.
  11. E. Brillas and C. A. Martínez Huitle, Synthetic Diamond Films: Preparation, Electrochemistry, Characterization and Applications, John Wiley & Sons, Hoboken, NJ, USA, 2011.
  12. K. Larsson, “Substitutional n-type doping of diamond,” Computational Materials Science, vol. 27, no. 1-2, pp. 23–29, 2003. View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  13. M. Nesladek, “Conventional n-type doping in diamond: state of the art and recent progress,” Semiconductor Science and Technology, vol. 20, no. 2, pp. R19–R27, 2005. View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  14. M. A. Pinault, J. Barjon, T. Kociniewski, F. Jomard, and J. Chevallier, “The n-type doping of diamond: present status and pending questions,” Physica B, vol. 401-402, pp. 51–56, 2007. View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  15. P. W. May, M. Davey, K. N. Rosser, and P. J. Heard, “Arsenic and antimony doping: an attempt to deposit n-type CVD diamond,” Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings, vol. 1039, 2008, paper no. 1039-P15-01. View at: Google Scholar
  16. M. A. Pinault-Thaurya, T. Tillochera, N. Habkaa et al., “n-Type CVD diamond: epitaxy and doping,” Materials Science and Engineering B. In press. View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  17. D. J. Poferl, N. C. Gardner, and J. C. Angus, “Growth of boron-doped diamond seed crystals by vapor deposition,” Journal of Applied Physics, vol. 44, no. 4, pp. 1428–1434, 1973. View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  18. V. S. Vavilov, “Semiconducting diamond,” Physica Status Solidi (A), vol. 31, no. 1, pp. 11–26, 1975. View at: Google Scholar
  19. A. T. Collins and E. C. Lightowlers, in The Properties of Diamond, J. E. Field, Ed., chapter 3, Academic Press, London, UK, 1979.
  20. B. V. Spitsyn, L. L. Bouilov, and B. V. Derjaguin, “Vapor growth of diamond on diamond and other surfaces,” Journal of Crystal Growth, vol. 52, no. 1, pp. 219–226, 1981. View at: Google Scholar
  21. N. Fujimori, T. Imai, and A. Doi, “Characterization of conducting diamond films,” Vacuum, vol. 36, no. 1–3, pp. 99–102, 1986. View at: Google Scholar
  22. K. Okano, H. Naruki, Y. Akiba, T. Kurosu, M. Iida, and Y. Hirose, “Synthesis of diamond thin films having semiconductive properties,” Japanese Journal of Applied Physics, Part 2, vol. 27, no. 2, pp. 173–175, 1988. View at: Google Scholar
  23. J. Mort, D. Kuhman, M. Machonkin et al., “Boron doping of diamond thin films,” Applied Physics Letters, vol. 55, no. 11, pp. 1121–1123, 1989. View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  24. K. Okano, H. Naruki, Y. Akiba et al., “Characterization of boron-doped diamond film,” Japanese Journal of Applied Physics, Part 1, vol. 28, no. 6, pp. 1066–1071, 1989. View at: Google Scholar
  25. W. Tsai, M. Delfino, D. Hodul et al., “Diamond MESFET using ultrashallow RTP boron doping,” Electron Device Letters, vol. 12, no. 4, pp. 157–159, 1991. View at: Google Scholar
  26. A. E. Alexenko and B. V. Spitsyn, “Semiconducting diamonds made in the USSR,” Diamond and Related Materials, vol. 1, no. 5-6, pp. 705–709, 1992. View at: Google Scholar
  27. C. Uzan-Saguy, A. Reznik, C. Cytermann et al., “Hydrogen diffusion in B-ion-implanted and B-doped homo-epitaxial diamond: passivation of defects vs. passivation of B acceptors,” Diamond and Related Materials, vol. 10, no. 3–7, pp. 453–458, 2001. View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  28. R. Samlenski, C. Haug, R. Brenn, C. Wild, R. Locher, and P. Koidl, “Characterisation and lattice location of nitrogen and boron in homoepitaxial CVD diamond,” Diamond and Related Materials, vol. 5, no. 9, pp. 947–951, 1996. View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  29. J. C. Angus, Y. V. Pleskov, and S. C. Eaton, “Chapter 3 Electrochemistry of diamond,” Semiconductors and Semimetals, vol. 77, pp. 97–119, 2004. View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  30. P. Wurzinger, P. Pongratz, P. Hartmann, R. Haubner, and B. Lux, “Investigation of the boron incorporation in polycrystalline CVD diamond films by TEM, EELS and Raman spectroscopy,” Diamond and Related Materials, vol. 6, no. 5–7, pp. 763–768, 1997. View at: Google Scholar
  31. P. Hartmann, S. Bohr, R. Haubner et al., “Diamond growth with boron addition,” International Journal of Refractory Metals and Hard Materials, vol. 16, no. 3, pp. 223–232, 1998. View at: Google Scholar
  32. X. H. Wang, G. H. M. Ma, W. Zhu et al., “Effects of boron doping on the surface morphology and structural imperfections of diamond films,” Diamond and Related Materials, vol. 1, no. 7, pp. 828–835, 1992. View at: Google Scholar
  33. E. Gheeraert, A. Deneuville, and J. Mambou, “Influence of diborane on the growth rate and phase stability of diamond films,” Carbon, vol. 37, no. 1, pp. 107–111, 1999. View at: Google Scholar
  34. R. Ramamurti, M. Becker, T. Schuelke, T. A. Grotjohn, D. K. Reinhard, and J. Asmussen, “Deposition of thick boron-doped homoepitaxial single crystal diamond by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition,” Diamond and Related Materials, vol. 18, no. 5–8, pp. 704–706, 2009. View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  35. J. Zhao, J. Wang, J. Zhi, and Z. Zhang, “Preparation of grain size controlled boron-doped diamond thin films and their applications in selective detection of glucose in basic solutions,” Science China Chemistry, vol. 53, no. 6, pp. 1378–1384, 2010. View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  36. X. Jiang, C. P. Klages, R. Zachai, M. Hartweg, and H. J. Füsser, “Epitaxial diamond thin films on (001) silicon substrates,” Applied Physics Letters, vol. 62, no. 26, pp. 3438–3440, 1993. View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  37. X. Jiang, M. Fryda, and C. L. Jia, “High quality heteroepitaxial diamond films on silicon: recent progresses,” Diamond and Related Materials, vol. 9, no. 9, pp. 1640–1645, 2000. View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  38. W. G. Eversole and N. Y. Kenmore, US Patents 3030187 and 3030188, 1962.
  39. J. C. Angus, H. A. Will, and W. S. Stanko, “Growth of diamond seed crystals by vapor deposition,” Journal of Applied Physics, vol. 39, no. 6, pp. 2915–2922, 1968. View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  40. B. V. Derjaguin, D. V. Fedoseev, V. M. Lukyanovich, B. V. Spitzin, V. A. Ryabov, and A. V. Lavrentyev, “Filamentary diamond crystals,” Journal of Crystal Growth, vol. 2, no. 6, pp. 380–384, 1968. View at: Google Scholar
  41. S. Matsumoto, Y. Sato, M. Tsutsumi, and N. Setaka, “Growth of diamond particles from methane-hydrogen gas,” Journal of Materials Science, vol. 17, no. 11, pp. 3106–3112, 1982. View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  42. R. A. Rudder, J. B. Posthill, and R. J. Markunas, “Thermal CVD of homoepitaxial diamond using CF4 and F2,” Electronics Letters, vol. 25, no. 18, pp. 1220–1221, 1989. View at: Google Scholar
  43. D. M. Gruen, S. Liu, A. R. Krauss, J. Luo, and X. Pan, “Fullerenes as precursors for diamond film growth without hydrogen or oxygen additions,” Applied Physics Letters, vol. 64, no. 12, pp. 1502–1504, 1994. View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  44. P. H. Gaskell, A. Saeed, P. Chieux, and D. R. McKenzie, “Neutron-scattering studies of the structure of highly tetrahedral amorphous diamondlike carbon,” Physical Review Letters, vol. 67, no. 10, pp. 1286–1289, 1991. View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  45. J. F. Prins, “Ion-implanted structures and doped layers in diamond,” Materials Science Reports, vol. 7, no. 7-8, pp. 275–364, 1992. View at: Google Scholar
  46. Q. Chen, J. Yang, and Z. Lin, “Synthesis of oriented textured diamond films on silicon via hot filament chemical vapor deposition,” Applied Physics Letters, vol. 67, no. 13, article 1853, 3 pages, 1995. View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  47. X. S. Sun, N. Wang, H. K. Woo et al., “The effect of ion bombardment on the nucleation of CVD diamond,” Diamond and Related Materials, vol. 8, no. 8-9, pp. 1414–1417, 1999. View at: Google Scholar
  48. P. Aublanc, V. P. Novikov, L. V. Kuznetsova, and M. Mermoux, “Diamond synthesis by electrolysis of acetates,” Diamond and Related Materials, vol. 10, no. 3–7, pp. 942–946, 2001. View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  49. V. V. S. S. Srikanth, Deposition and Characterization of Nanocrystalline Diamond/β-SiC Composite Film System, Shaker, Aachen, Germany, 2008.
  50. C. D. Clark, R. W. Ditchburn, and H. B. Dyer, “The absorption spectra of natural and irradiated diamonds,” Proceedings of the Royal Society A, vol. 234, no. 1198, pp. 363–381, 1956. View at: Google Scholar
  51. C. D. Clark, P. J. Dean, and P. V. Harris, “Intrinsic Edge Absorption in Diamond,” Proceedings of the Royal Society A, vol. 277, no. 1370, pp. 312–329, 1964. View at: Google Scholar
  52. P. J. Dean and I. H. Jones, “Recombination radiation from diamond,” Physical Review A, vol. 133, no. 6, pp. A1698–A1705, 1964. View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  53. J. Singh, Physics of Semiconductors and Their Heterostructures, McGraw-Hill, New York, NY, USA, 1993.
  54. M. I. Landstrass and K. V. Ravi, “Resistivity of chemical vapor deposited diamond films,” Applied Physics Letters, vol. 55, no. 10, pp. 975–977, 1989. View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  55. J. Ristein, “Surface transfer doping of diamond,” Journal of Physics D, vol. 39, no. 4, pp. R71–R81, 2006. View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  56. R. Kalish, “Nano-scale modification and doping of diamond:Interesting science and promising technology,” International Journal of Nanotechnology, vol. 6, no. 7-8, pp. 691–703, 2009. View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  57. Y. V. Pleskov, M. D. Krotova, V. V. Elkin, V. G. Ralchenko, A. V. Khomich, and R. A. Khmelnitskiy, “The vacuum-annealed undoped polycrystalline CVD diamond electrodes: the impedance-spectroscopy and photoelectrochemical studies,” Electrochimica Acta, vol. 50, no. 5, pp. 1149–1156, 2005. View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  58. S. Prawer and R. Kalish, “Ion-beam-induced transformation of diamond,” Physical Review B, vol. 51, no. 22, pp. 15711–15722, 1995. View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  59. R. Kalish, “Doping of diamond by ion implantation,” in Thin-Film Diamond I, C. E. Nebel and J. Ristein, Eds., chapter 3, Elsevier, Menlo Park, Calif, USA, 2003. View at: Google Scholar
  60. A. Deneuville, “Boron doping of diamond films from the gas phase,” in Thin-Film Diamond I, C. E. Nebel and J. Ristein, Eds., chapter 4, Elsevier, Menlo Park, Calif, USA, 2003. View at: Google Scholar
  61. J. P. Biersack and L. G. Haggmark, “A Monte Carlo computer program for the transport of energetic ions in amorphous targets,” Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research, vol. 174, no. 1-2, pp. 257–269, 1980. View at: Google Scholar
  62. J. P. Goss, R. J. Eyre, and P. R. Briddon, “Theoretical models for doping diamond for semiconductor applications,” in Physics and Applications of CVD Diamond, S. Koizumi, C. Nebel, and M. Nesladek, Eds., chapter 8, John Wiley & Sons, Weinheim, Germany, 2008. View at: Google Scholar
  63. R. Haubner, S. Bohr, and B. Lux, “Comparison of P, N and B additions during CVD diamond deposition,” Diamond and Related Materials, vol. 8, no. 2–5, pp. 171–178, 1999. View at: Google Scholar
  64. P. Gonon, A. Deneuville, F. Fontaine et al., “Chemical vapor deposition of B-doped polycrystalline diamond films: growth rate and incorporation efficiency of dopants,” Journal of Applied Physics, vol. 78, no. 12, pp. 7404–7406, 1995. View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  65. M. Hata, M. Tsuda, N. Fujii, and S. Oikawa, “Surface migration enhancement of adatoms in the photoexcited process on reconstructed diamond (001) surfaces,” Applied Surface Science, vol. 79-80, pp. 255–263, 1994. View at: Google Scholar
  66. R. Locher, J. Wagner, F. Fuchs, M. Maier, P. Gonon, and P. Koidl, “Optical and electrical characterization of boron-doped diamond films,” Diamond and Related Materials, vol. 4, no. 5-6, pp. 678–683, 1995. View at: Google Scholar
  67. J. H. Edgar, Z. Y. Xie, and D. N. Braski, “The effects of the simultaneous addition of diborane and ammonia on the hot-filament assisted chemical vapor deposition of diamond,” Diamond and Related Materials, vol. 7, no. 1, pp. 35–42, 1998. View at: Google Scholar
  68. E. B. Lombardi, A. Mainwood, and K. Osuch, “Interaction of hydrogen with boron, phosphorus, and sulfur in diamond,” Physical Review B, vol. 70, no. 20, Article ID 205201, pp. 205201–12, 2004. View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  69. Z. Teukam, J. Chevallier, C. Saguy et al., “Shallow donors with high n-type electrical conductivity in homoepitaxial deuterated boron-doped diamond layers,” Nature Materials, vol. 2, no. 7, pp. 482–486, 2003. View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  70. J. P. Goss and P. R. Briddon, “Theory of boron aggregates in diamond: first-principles calculations,” Physical Review B, vol. 73, no. 8, Article ID 085204, 8 pages, 2006. View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  71. M. Suzuki, H. Yoshida, N. Sakuma et al., “Electrical properties of B-related acceptor in B-doped homoepitaxial diamond layers grown by microwave plasma CVD,” Diamond and Related Materials, vol. 13, no. 1, pp. 198–202, 2004. View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  72. M. Fryda, L. Schäfer, and I. Tröster, “Doped diamond—a new material for industrial electrochemistry,” Recent Research Developments in Electrochemistry, vol. 4, pp. 85–97, 2000. View at: Google Scholar
  73. W. Haenni, P. Rychen, M. Fryda, and C. Comninellis, “Industrial application of diamond electrode,” in Thin-Film Diamond II, C. E. Nebel and J. Ristein, Eds., chapter 5, Elsevier, Menlo Park, Calif, USA, 2004. View at: Google Scholar
  74. M. Fryda, T. Matthée, S. Mulcahy, A. Hampel, L. Schäfer, and I. Tröster, “Fabrication and application of Diachem® electrodes,” Diamond and Related Materials, vol. 12, no. 10-11, pp. 1950–1956, 2003. View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  75. C. H. Goeting, F. Jones, J. S. Foord et al., “Electrochemistry at boron-doped diamond films grown on graphite substrates: redox-, adsorption and deposition processes,” Journal of Electroanalytical Chemistry, vol. 442, no. 1-2, pp. 207–216, 1998. View at: Google Scholar
  76. H. B. Martin, A. Argoitia, J. C. Angus, and U. Landau, “Voltammetry studies of single-crystal and polycrystalline diamond electrodes,” Journal of the Electrochemical Society, vol. 146, no. 8, pp. 2959–2964, 1999. View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  77. J. van de Lagemaat, D. Vanmaekelbergh, and J. J. Kelly, “Electrochemistry of homoepitaxial CVD diamond: energetics and electrode kinetics in aqueous electrolytes,” Journal of Electroanalytical Chemistry, vol. 475, no. 2, pp. 139–151, 1999. View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  78. J. P. Goss, P. R. Briddon, R. Jones et al., “Deep hydrogen traps in heavily B-doped diamond,” Physical Review B, vol. 68, no. 23, pp. 2352091–23520910, 2003. View at: Google Scholar
  79. L. G. Wang and A. Zunger, “Phosphorus and sulphur doping of diamond,” Physical Review B, vol. 66, no. 16, Article ID 161202, pp. 1612021–1612024, 2002. View at: Google Scholar
  80. P. A. Crowther, P. J. Dean, and W. F. Sherman, “Excitation spectrum of aluminum acceptors in diamond under uniaxial stress,” Physical Review, vol. 154, no. 3, pp. 772–785, 1967. View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  81. T. Tshepe, C. Kasl, J. F. Prins, and M. J. R. Hoch, “Metal-insulator transition in boron-ion-implanted diamond,” Physical Review B, vol. 70, no. 24, Article ID 245107, 7 pages, 2004. View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  82. O. E. Tall, N. J. Renault, M. Sigaud, and O. Vittori, “Anodic stripping voltammetry of heavy metals at nanocrystalline boron-doped diamond electrode,” Electroanalysis, vol. 19, no. 11, pp. 1152–1159, 2007. View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  83. M. A. Q. Alfaro, S. Ferro, C. A. Martínez-Huitle, and Y. M. Vong, “Boron doped diamond electrode for the wastewater treatment,” Journal of the Brazilian Chemical Society, vol. 17, no. 2, pp. 227–236, 2006. View at: Google Scholar
  84. H. Yu, H. Wang, X. Quan, S. Chen, and Y. Zhang, “Amperometric determination of chemical oxygen demand using boron-doped diamond (BDD) sensor,” Electrochemistry Communications, vol. 9, no. 9, pp. 2280–2285, 2007. View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  85. H. Yu, C. Ma, X. Quan, S. Chen, and H. Zhao, “Flow injection analysis of chemical oxygen demand (COD) by using a boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrode,” Environmental Science and Technology, vol. 43, no. 6, pp. 1935–1939, 2009. View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  86. M. Panizza and G. Cerisola, “Application of diamond electrodes to electrochemical processes,” Electrochimica Acta, vol. 51, no. 2, pp. 191–199, 2005. View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  87. H. Y. Chan, D. M. Aslam, J. A. Wiler, and B. Casey, “A novel diamond microprobe for neuro-chemical and -electrical recording in neural prosthesis,” Journal of Microelectromechanical Systems, vol. 18, no. 3, pp. 511–521, 2009. View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  88. Y. Zhou and J. Zhi, “The application of boron-doped diamond electrodes in amperometric biosensors,” Talanta, vol. 79, no. 5, pp. 1189–1196, 2009. View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar

Copyright © 2012 Vadali V. S. S. Srikanth et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


More related articles

2971 Views | 1226 Downloads | 10 Citations
 PDF  Download Citation  Citation
 Download other formatsMore
 Order printed copiesOrder

Related articles

We are committed to sharing findings related to COVID-19 as quickly and safely as possible. Any author submitting a COVID-19 paper should notify us at help@hindawi.com to ensure their research is fast-tracked and made available on a preprint server as soon as possible. We will be providing unlimited waivers of publication charges for accepted articles related to COVID-19. Sign up here as a reviewer to help fast-track new submissions.