Table of Contents
International Journal of Family Medicine
Volume 2012, Article ID 376907, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/376907
Research Article

Physician Cross-Cultural Nonverbal Communication Skills, Patient Satisfaction and Health Outcomes in the Physician-Patient Relationship

Department of Psychology, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA

Received 22 November 2011; Revised 7 March 2012; Accepted 17 April 2012

Academic Editor: P. Van Royen

Copyright © 2012 Ken Russell Coelho and Chardee Galan. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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