Table of Contents
International Journal of Family Medicine
Volume 2012, Article ID 474989, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/474989
Clinical Study

Undetected Common Mental Disorders in Long-Term Sickness Absence

Regional Psychiatric Services Central Denmark Region, Research Unit West and Centre for Psychiatric Research, 7400 Herning, Denmark

Received 3 October 2011; Revised 24 January 2012; Accepted 20 February 2012

Academic Editor: Marta Buszewicz

Copyright © 2012 Hans Joergen Soegaard. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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