International Journal of Family Medicine / 2013 / Article / Tab 4

Research Article

Danish General Practitioners' Use of Prostate-Specific Antigen in Opportunistic Screening for Prostate Cancer: A Survey Comprising 174 GPs

Table 4

Subtables comparing the GPs responses to whether they would measure PSA and their rationale behind PSA indication for symptomatic patients.

GPs responses to the corresponding questions regarding their rationale behind the PSA indication.PSA indication*, n (%) value
YesNoDo not know

Case D
Patients with LUTS should have measured PSA.
 Yes88 (94.6)0 (0.0)0 (0.0)0.064
 No4 (4.3)1 (100.0)0 (0.0)
 Do not know1 (1.1)0 (0.0)0 (0.0)
The patient should have measured PSA, due to a family history of PC.
 Yes73 (79.3)0 (0.0)0 (0.0)0.215
 No10 (10.9)1 (100.0)0 (0.0)
 Do not know9 (9.8)0 (0.0)0 (0.0)

Case E
Patients with LUTS and lower back pain should have measured PSA.
 Yes89 (98.9)0 (0.0)0 (0.0)<0.001
 No0 (0.0)1 (100.0)1 (25.0)
 Do not know1 (1.1)0 (0.0)3 (75.0)
A PSA should only be measured if the prostate is palpated enlarged, hard, and knobbly.
 Yes6 (6.9)2 (100)1 (25.0)<0.001
 No77 (88.5)0 (0.0)1 (25.0)
 Do not know4 (4.6)0 (0.0)2 (50.0)

The proportion of missing data was between 3.1% and 5.1%.

Article of the Year Award: Outstanding research contributions of 2020, as selected by our Chief Editors. Read the winning articles.